A Blueprint for Formula 1 in the US

I’m a massive Formula 1 fan. Like, ridiculously obsessed: stay-up-till-2-AM-watching-practice-sessions-from-Malaysia obsessed. I watch the races, follow storylines religiously on my favorite F1 blogs, and always scan the YouTubes looking for historic clips of the “good old days.” But as an American, my kind are few and far between, so I’ve often wondered how to make the sport more popular here in the US.

Obviously, there are a few basic things that I, as a Formula 1 fan, would like to see changed – the cost of tickets at F1 races, the sport’s policy of ripping down videos from YouTube, and the general lack of respect the sport shows to its fans to name a few. Then there’s what I want from the sport as an American fan: a return of the United States Grand Prix being the bare minimum. But the best strategy to increase F1’s popularity here may be to copy baseball.

Think about it – no sport treasures its history like baseball does. The game is built on records and players from decades long since past, its numbers and superstars revered to an extent not seen anywhere else. Baseball’s Hall of Fame in Cooperstown is sacred ground because the legends who are enshrined there – you can’t say the same about the NFL’s Hall in Canton, or Basketball’s in Springfield. That’s because baseball is full of history, and the same can be said of motor racing and Formula 1.

F1, like baseball, has a history built on records and drivers from a  very long time ago – and stressing that history might bring the kind of fans that baseball has over to F1. Show Americans Juan Manuel Fangio’s legendary 1957 race at the Nurburgring, the frantic finish at the ’69 Italian Grand Prix, the Gilles Villneuve-Rene Arnoux battle from 1979’s French GP, Ayrton Senna’s heroics in 1993 at Donnington, or any of the other legendary F1 performances. Make it so fans revere the names of Nuvolari, Clark, and Hunt the way they do Ruth, Mays, and Aaron, and F1 will surge past NASCRAP in the hearts of Americans.

Sure, Formula 1 isn’t what it used to be – there’s a lack of good quality racing, a domination by sponsors, and a media that forces drivers to become drones (you won’t see this or this nowadays). But if the sport can build a fanbase here on its history the same way baseball has, it will enjoy popularity in the US that it’s had around the world for decades.

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2 Responses

  1. Merhaba iyi günler blog yötecisi. Yazınızı içeriği N dikkatlice okudum.Faydalı denebilecek yazılar olmuş. Yanlız yorum butonunda sorun var sanırım baya zorlandım yorumu göndermek için. İyi çalışmalar.

  2. Merhaba iyi günler blog yötecisi. Yazınızı içeriği N dikkatlice okudum.Faydalı denebilecek yazılar olmuş. Yanlız yorum butonunda sorun var sanırım baya zorlandım yorumu göndermek için. İyi çalışmalar.

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